Tag Archives: Nutrition

12 Reasons to increase Water

  • Fluid balance. Roughly 60 percent of the body is made of water. Drinking enough H2O maintains the body’s fluid balance, which helps transport nutrients in the body, regulate body temperature, digest food, and more.
     
  • Calorie control. Forget other diet tricks—drinking water could also help with weight loss. Numerous studies have found a connection between water consumption and losing a few pounds . The secret reason? Water simply helps people feel full, and as a result consume fewer calories.
     
  • Muscle fuel. Sweating at the gym causes muscles to lose water. And when the muscles don’t have enough water, they get tired . So for extra energy, try drinking water to push through that final set of squats.
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  • Clearer skin. Certain toxins in the body can cause the skin to inflame, which results in clogged pores and acne . While science saying water makes the skin wrinkle free is contradictory, water does flush out these toxins and can reduce the risk of pimples.
     
  • Kidney function. Our kidneys process 200 quarts of blood daily, sifting out waste and transporting urine to the bladder. Yet, kidneys need  enough fluids to clear away what we don’t need in the body. Let’s drink to that!
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  • Productivity boost. In order to really focus, a glass of water could help people concentrate and stay refreshed and alert.
     
  • Fatigue buster. Move over coffee—water can help fight those tired eyes too . One of the most common symptoms of dehydration is tiredness. Just another reason to go for the big gulp! (Not the 7-11 kind.)
     
  • Hangover help. If booze has got the best of you, help a hangover with a glass of water to hydrate the body and stop that pounding headache.
     
  • Pain prevention. A little water can really go a long way. Aching joints and muscle cramps and strains can all occur if the body is dehydrated .
     
  • Keep things flowing. Nobody wants to deal with digestion issues. Luckily, drinking enough water adds fluids to the colon which helps make things, ahem, move smoothly.
     
  • Sickness fighter. Water may help with decongestion and dehydration, helping the body bounce back when feeling under the weather. Just beware—drinking fluids hasn’t been scientifically proven to beat colds in one swoop, so don’t swap this for a trip to the doctor or other cold remedies.
     
  • Brain boost. A study in London found a link between students bringing water into an exam room and better grades, suggesting H2O promotes clearer thinking. While it’s unclear if drinking the water had anything to do with a better score, it doesn’t hurt to try it out! 

neuronFrom Greatist

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July 11 – National Rainier Cherry Day

In 1952 at Washington State University, Harold Fogle created a new cherry by cross-breeding the Bing and Van cherry varieties.  This new cherry was named after Mount Rainier.  Now, each year on July 11, it is National Rainier Cherry Day.

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Not only are cherries delicious they are so good for you!

Everyone’s favorite Bing cherry can significantly decrease concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers in the blood. And decreased biomarkers may reduce risk or modify the severity of inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and cancer.

So that beautifully sweet, fat-free, cholesterol-free northwest cherry can benefit your body as well as your taste buds.

Study demonstrates that cherry consumption selectively reduced several biomarkers associated with inflammatory diseases.

Recipe: Turkey Meatballs with Hummus

Cook up turkey meatballs with a Mediterranean twist AND more veggies! Hummus – which is mostly chickpeas and tahini — boosts flavor and adds more beans to your next meatballs meal.

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Turkey Meatballs with Hummus

Thanks for Fruit and Veggie, More Matters, Click here for more

Ingredients

1 pound ground turkey

1 teaspoon salt

½ cup Sabra (or your favorite) Roasted Garlic Hummus

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon cumin

½ teaspoon oregano

¼ teaspoon ground cloves

Handful chopped herbs (mint, parsley, and basil)

Olive oil

Directions

Mix well all the ingredients.

Form meatballs.

Place them on a skewer.

Brush them with olive oil.

Grill them on medium heat for about 5 minutes each side.

Nutritional Information

  • Calories:    
  • Carbohydrates:    g
  • Total Fat:    g
  • Cholesterol:    mg
  • Saturated Fat:   g
  • Dietary Fiber:    g
  • % of Calories from Fat:    %
  • Sodium:     mg
  • Protein:    g

Garlic Chicken

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Recipe By: EatingWell Test Kitchen, link here
“Whole garlic cloves are mild when simmered with chicken in a simple white wine-mustard sauce in this garlic chicken recipe. “

Ingredients

    • 2 heads garlic, cloves separated
    • 8 chicken drumsticks (about 2½ pounds), skin removed, trimmed
    • ½ teaspoon salt, divided
    • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
    • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    • ⅓ cup white wine
    • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
    • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    • 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
    • ⅓ cup chopped fresh chives or scallion greens

Directions

  • 1Lightly smash garlic cloves with the side of a large knife to loosen the skins. Peel; cut larger ones in half. Sprinkle chicken with ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper.
  • 2Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Remove to a plate with a slotted spoon.
  • 3Add chicken to the pan and cook until browned on one side, about 4 minutes. Turn it over and return the garlic to the pan. Add wine and cook for 1 minute.
  • 4Whisk broth, mustard, flour and the remaining ¼ teaspoon salt in a small bowl. Add the mixture to the pan; bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a lively simmer. Cover and cook until the chicken is cooked through, 8 to 10 minutes. Serve sprinkled with chives (or scallion greens).
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Fruits and Veggies, More Matters

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Aromatic braised chicken, hidden veg and quinoa hot pot

This is the last of the great recipes posted in The Guardian, Eat Well For Less.  Click here for the full article.

One pot and you’re good to go. The braised, browned and caramelised meat intensifies and spreads the meaty flavour allowing you to sneak in plenty of protective fibre and veg. Quinoa? Because it’s not that fancy any more and with its low glycaemic index it’s better than eating refined carbs.

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Serves 4–6 (good to make a big batch, you’ll want the extra)

chicken 8 skinless, boneless thighs
extra-virgin olive oil
onions 2 large
leek 1 large (or add a third onion)
garlic 6 cloves
ginger a thumb-sized piece
chillies 4 red or green (seeds out for a milder version)
tomato puree 2 large tbsp
honey 1 tbsp
soy sauce 6 tbsp
star anise 1
chestnut mushrooms 2 handfuls
Chinese leaf cabbage ½ a head
quinoa 50g per person
spring onions 4, chopped

Use a heavy cast-iron dish in an oven (preheated to 160C/ gas mark 3) for the best, slow-cooked meltiness. You can also just simmer on the hob.

Roughly chop the chicken into large strips and brown over a high heat with a splash of olive oil. Don’t overcrowd the pan and if necessary brown the chicken in two batches. Stir occasionally but you are aiming to get some crispy caramelised bits on the edges and bottom of the pan to add umami intensity to the dish.

Peel, half and roughly chop the onions into large strips. Do the same with the leek and wash thoroughly to get rid of any muddy bits in the layers. Add to the pan with the browned chicken and start to soften.

Peel and roughly chop the garlic and ginger together with the chillies. Leave the seeds in if you like spice or remove if you prefer perfumed warmth. Add to the pan with the tomato puree. Cook together for another couple of minutes.

Now add the honey, soy sauce, star anise and enough cold water to barely cover (around 2 glasses usually). Bring to a simmer and scrape around the bottom of the pan to dislodge any crispy bits. Place in your preheated oven to slow cook and braise for the next 2 hours.

After 2 hours remove, stir and check the hot pot. You should have a reduced, intensely umami-flavoured sauce. You want this to be strong because it will become diluted by the water in the additional veg. Now add your washed and sliced mushrooms and Chinese cabbage. Return to the oven for another hour.

Towards the end, boil the quinoa separately until the seeds open. Drain and then add straight into the hot pot and stir together. Fish out the star anise and taste for final seasoning – add a final splash of soy sauce if you like. Garnish with finely chopped spring onion for a fresh finish.

 

Garlic Chicken

3758019.jpg
Recipe By: EatingWell Test Kitchen, link here
“Whole garlic cloves are mild when simmered with chicken in a simple white wine-mustard sauce in this garlic chicken recipe. “

Ingredients

    • 2 heads garlic, cloves separated
    • 8 chicken drumsticks (about 2½ pounds), skin removed, trimmed
    • ½ teaspoon salt, divided
    • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
    • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    • ⅓ cup white wine
    • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
    • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    • 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
    • ⅓ cup chopped fresh chives or scallion greens

Directions

  • 1Lightly smash garlic cloves with the side of a large knife to loosen the skins. Peel; cut larger ones in half. Sprinkle chicken with ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper.
  • 2Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Remove to a plate with a slotted spoon.
  • 3Add chicken to the pan and cook until browned on one side, about 4 minutes. Turn it over and return the garlic to the pan. Add wine and cook for 1 minute.
  • 4Whisk broth, mustard, flour and the remaining ¼ teaspoon salt in a small bowl. Add the mixture to the pan; bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a lively simmer. Cover and cook until the chicken is cooked through, 8 to 10 minutes. Serve sprinkled with chives (or scallion greens).